Surviving Where You Are

Usually, during times of severe weather forecastings, I get inquiries about what I have in place to prepare. Here are my suggestions, but, as I have always encouraged, do your own research:

#1 ASSUMPTION: Focus on the assumption that ALL public utilities (water, sewage, electric) will be unavailable or contaminated and that you will not be able leave your house for a week or more. Calculate your needs based on what, and how much, you use on a regular basis then add to that by 10% just in case things get worse or friends/family need assistance.

ORGANIZE:
Store supplies in a centralized, dry and cool location so they can be easily accessed when an emergency strikes and to regularly monitor and add to them throughout the year. Rotate expiring items with new and use expiring items first. The tendency is to get anxious and panic when an emergency strikes. Organizing will reduce stress by not having to guess where things are, what you have and what you need to replenish.

SHELTER:
Survey your living quarters to identify security gaps or possible gaps in the roof or around windows and doors where water/rain can get in. I have always believed that you can't caulk (silicone) enough. Have extra caulk, rubberized tape (Flex Seal) and, of course, Duct Tape for emergency repairs.
Shelter

HEAT/WARMTH:
Wood stove, fireplace or propane/kerosene heaters. A popular and safe propane heater is "Mister Heater". Make sure to have proper ventilation for all fuel/combustable heaters.

STAYING COOL:
Cooling the Living Area and the Body

WATER:
- 1 gallon per person per day for drinking and additional for sanitation. Use sparingly - ration.
- Purchase or fill water containers (every 6 months). Use only containers that were previously used for water (not milk or other products that can cause/retain bacteria)
- Turn off access to public water (to avoid contamination). Before an emergency event, fill sinks, bath tubs and containers
- Factory bottled water lasts about 1 year. Water in reused containers lasts about 6 months (add a few drops of bleach to preserve).
- Don't throw away "expired" water. Use it for washing, watering plants or other non-consumable purposes.
Water Gathering, Treatment & Storage
Water Collection from Nature

FOOD:
Canned or dehydrated foods and drink/milk mixes.
Cook on a grill (propane or charcoal) or over a fire or in a fireplace (wood).
Emergency Food Preparations
Refrigeration

POWER:
Generator (my favorites are Honda and Yamaha 3000 with electric start, inverter and noise dampening) or solar/battery. Limit the number of devices you "need" to run in order to conserve the gas needed to run the generator. The more devices plugged in to the generator, the less time it will run. Change generator oil at least once a year; more if used frequently.
No Power? No Problem!

LIGHT:
Solar powered flashlights/lighting or a large supply of batteries. Candles. Use generator to run electricity as a last resort.
Battery-Less Devices

FUEL:
At least TWO 5-gallon filled gas containers with fuel stabilizer (Sta-Bil, etc.). Replace every 6 months by using old fuel in vehicles then refill gas containers
At least TWO 40-pound (grill-size) filled Propane Tanks
Charcoal for cooking fires and warmth (outside)
Kerosene or propane for heater

FIRST AID KIT AND PRESCRIPTIONS:
Emergency Medical Preparations

PERSONAL CARE:
- Toilet paper and paper towels are always good to have in abundance.
- Used, but unsoiled, paper towels can be a toilet paper substitute as well as newspaper, magazines and clean rags cut into small squares.
- Plumbing issues may affect flushing a toilet. Consider a 5-gallon bucket, heavy-duty trash can liner and kitty litter as an alternative.
Bathe Without Showering
Laundry
Plumbing Outage

COMMUNICATIONS & ENTERTAINMENT:
Entertainment
Communications

SECURITY / DEFENSE:
Security & Defense Strategies

Reference:
Learn The Secrets Of Urban Survival To Keep You Alive After Man-Made Disasters, Natural Disasters, and Breakdowns In Civil Order.
Introduction Presentation by David Morris Purchase Book or Kindle (by David Morris) on Amazon.com

See Also:
Emergency Preparations 101
Bug Out or Stay Put ?